Project ST1300

The stock ST1300 is an amazing platform to start with and I have no doubt that there are other solutions out there but we’ll be documenting what was the best fit for this this situation. These aren’t going to be “How-To” tips, but instead are going to be more of a Before and After summary, outlining the upgrades we selected for this bike. For a great ST11/13 resource you can visit http://www.st-owners.com

The ST has a great charging system, and we’re being very careful to install most of the electrical accessories on a switched circuit but we also wanted to plan for the “just in case” situation where the bike might not start because of a dead battery.

Getting to the battery on the ST is fairly simple in that you have to remove the seats and then remove 3-bolts that hold on the right side cover. Once the cover is off you can access the battery if you want to take a peek at the connections or jump start the bike.

On our project ST we decided to add a set of the 2 piece jumper cables so that none of that had to be done. This will be especially handy when the bike is loaded for long trips so you don’t have to pull off anything that is strapped down to the passenger seat area.

Installation is very straight forward because, as I already mentioned, you gain access to the battery by removing the seat and side cover. Once you have the side cover off you can see the battery and the terminals.

The kit comes with an 18″ whip and you attach the red to the positive, and the black to the negative. It doesn’t get much more straight forward than that. Once you’ve got it installed you have a 2-pin SAE connector similar to the one some battery chargers use but this whip is thick 10 gauge wire. DO NOT try to jump start your bike with the whip that your battery charger came with, it’s not a thick enough gauge.

The second part of the kit is a 12′ cable that will be stored in the tail trunk and, like the whip, is 10 gauge and has the 2-pin SAE and will plug right into the bike on one end. The other end has a set of clams that you can connect to the bike you are getting the jump start from.

It’s really as simple as that and when the install is complete you can hardly tell that you have the jumpers installed. We pulled ours out a little for the picture but it will be tucked away until it’s needed (which will hopefully be never)

  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo
  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo
  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo

I’ll admit it. Ripping all the plastic off of the bike was something I wasn’t looking forward to. I had already broken one of the small plastic push-rivets when I tried to hunt down the fuse for the blown Powerlet plug and stopped right there before I did any more damage.

Thankfully, ST-Guru Curt Gran had offered to walk us through the CORRECT procedure prior to our Fuzeblock Tech-Day. We’ll see how well this sunk in when it comes time to re-assemble the bike.

  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo

Now that we were down to the bones of the bike, install of the Fuse block(s) would be much simpler. The plan was to place 2 Fuzeblock FZ-1’s on the bike. One was going to be in the the back tail section and one in front, attached to the inside of the fairing, to the fairing pocket wall.  The whole reason behind this was that, with so much dis-assembly required to get into the bike, placing one in the front and one in the back would minimize the need to rip into it again if accessories are added down the road.

For the back fuseblock power and ground were taken from the battery and we pulled the switched power off of the tail light power wire. For the front we again went to the battery for the power and ground but for our switched source we used a Quartet Harness which is under the left front body panel. Again trying to keep it straightforward and simple which always makes future troubleshooting easier.

Posi-Tap Connector from Posi-Lock

Tip: We ALWAYS use Posi-Lock’s Posi-Tap when tapping into a wiring harness. Posi-taps make a small hole in the wires insulation and then spread the strands apart while making contact. Think of dipping your finger in water. You penetrate the surface and the water conforms around your finger. Then, if you ever remove the tap’s, you just apply a little sealant to the insulation and you’re good to go. Again, less chance of trouble caused by vibration and moisture down the road.

Since both Fuse Blocks are in place and all wires are cut to length, we make sure to wrap all of the wires going from the battery to the blocks in a sleeving. I like to put shrink-wrap tubing on both ends of the sleeving so that they don’t fray or start to slide one way or the other. This helps protect the wiring from heat and vibration which can cause you problems down the road.

Another thing that can cause you problems down the road is poor cable routing. Make sure that you run the wires in a path that won’t be stressed because of lenght, that it’s not running across any sharp edges, and that you don’t have any other hard parts that are going to come into direct contact with it. All of these issues can cause the wires to fray or break.

  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo
  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo
  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo

Now, with both blocks in place and tested it’s time to proceed with the next Accessory. We’re going to take the stock GIVI and make it more visible by adding LED lighting to it.

For our project ST1300 we’re STarting with a STock ST1300 and documenting the work as we go along.

Without further ado, I present our project subject.

Meet, a 2007 ST1300A whos only mod up until now has been:

  • Givi Top case
  • 1 – Powerlet plug (this was blown on the day of pickup and the fuse was very inaccessible)
  • A set of driving lamps

Let the games begin!

  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo
  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo
  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo
  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo
  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo
  • Tony (hotspice)'s photo